Advanced Music Theory – Harmony

Share it with your friends Like

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

Close

Harmonizing a melody with chords, inversions and cadences.
● Learn music online with Music Matters
➣ http://www.mmcourses.co.uk

● About this Course:
The Music Matters Advanced Theory course is for musicians who want to take their music theory knowledge to the highest level. Presented to you by ABRSM Examiner Gareth Green, this course features detailed explanations and written examples on each topic. and most importantly, we connect all the theory with sound, so you know exactly how each topic comes across in real music. Suitable for candidates preparing for ABRSM grade 6, grade 7 and grade 8 music theory exams.

Sign up today. You’ll soon feel really confident with music theory and it will revolutionise all your music making!

● Music Matters
➣ Website: http://www.mmcourses.co.uk
➣ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MusicMattersGB
➣ Twitter: https://twitter.com/MusicMattersGB

Comments

philip Evans says:

Peerless presentation……I was going to take music lesson locally, however these lectures make that unnecessary……I hope that I will be able to find a lecture on extended chords because I enjoy find new sounds to established tunes like “The Skye Boat Song”……….this has become my hobby since retiring. I can’t thank you enough.

ian charles says:

So very very helpful, many thanks.

Mutia Amelia says:

Thank you for sharing the knowledge!

arjuna207 says:

when i learned harmony in highschool we would write the ending as a delay 6/4 – 5/3

Nathaniel Bennett says:

Best Music theory video I've watched. I shall watch it again and again and again.

mrconcept says:

Amazing lesson. Thank You 🙂

Nicola Limongi says:

amazing teacher! thanks a lot!

Antonio Rodolpho says:

Thank ypo so much

paxwallacejazz says:

Yeah you know advanced concepts using triads are all chromatically altered harmonies like C over Ab in the bass or Dtriad over Eb pedal.

Ákos Petik says:

You are very good music teacher.Congratulations!

Ward de jager says:

I've never heard of naming inverted chords as a/b/c chords .
Is this common in the u.s. ?

Write a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.